Islamic Chaplaincy

Master of Divinity(MDIV)
Islamic Chaplaincy

Master of Divinity(MDIV) Islamic Chaplaincy

This 3-year degree program initiated in partnership with the Claremont School of Theology (CST) and that specific degree will be attained by those Bayan students who began in the program before Bayan’s partnership with Chicago Theological Seminary (CTS), which was Fall 2019.

Both programs equip men and women with a firm grounding in Islamic thought and cultivate practical skills in spiritual care, cultural sensitivity, religious leadership, and chaplaincy.

The main difference between students completing the degree with CST instead of CTS is that they must enroll in a thesis project course pertaining to vocational praxis towards the end of their coursework. This is a 72-unit program.

Whereas students enrolled in the program at CTS will need to enroll in a number of courses offered by CTS faculty and complete a unit of Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) and Field Education. This is a 75-unit program.

The breakdown of course hours required for the program at CTS is shown below since that is the institution from which Bayan students will begin graduating with their Islamic Chaplaincy degrees from Fall 2020 and onward.

Courses offered for each category can be found on the  Course Descriptions

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Required: 5 Courses for All Degree Plans

Substitution: "Islamic Leadership and Spirituality" only allowed to replace “Islamic Ethics” for Islamic Leadership students.

Additional Required Courses for the concentration:

Intermediate Arabic 2A

Arabic 2A (Fall, 3 units) or Summer Intensive 2A (8 weeks, 6 units)

Students further develop their reading, speaking, listening, and writing skills, while expanding their vocabulary. They will master more complex grammar and syntax involving words derived from Arabic root patterns, using them to produce extended sentences and passages. They also master conjunctions and additional verb tenses. Performance-based formative assessments will help students achieve the equivalent of the second year of university-level Arabic.

Note: Intermediate Arabic is required for the M.A. in Islamic Studies & Leadership and the M.Div. in Islamic Chaplaincy. It is not required for the M.A. in Islamic Education, though the courses may be taken as electives.

Intermediate Arabic 2B

Arabic 2B (Spring, 3 units) or Summer Intensive 2B (8 weeks, 6 units)

Students further develop their reading, speaking, listening, and writing skills, while expanding their vocabulary. They will master more complex grammar and syntax involving words derived from Arabic root patterns, using them to produce extended sentences and passages. They also master conjunctions and additional verb tenses. Performance-based formative assessments will help students achieve the equivalent of the second year of university-level Arabic.

Note: Intermediate Arabic is required for the M.A. in Islamic Studies & Leadership and the M.Div. in Islamic Chaplaincy. It is not required for the M.A. in Islamic Education, though the courses may be taken as electives.

Elective Courses for the Concentration (4):

Students may select four courses from any elective offerings from Bayan or CTS, and are recommended to select from the following Bayan courses:

The Life, Times and Teachings of the Prophet Muhammad

This course focuses on the life experiences and teachings of the Prophet Muhammad, taking into account the historical context, social norms, and religious atmosphere of pre-Islamic Arabia. Students learn about the Prophet’s character and qualities, his manner of leadership, and the impact of his example on subsequent generations of Muslims. Finally, students gain insight regarding the ways in which the Prophet is commemorated as part of Islamic sacred history.

Preaching and Public Presentation of Islam

This key leadership development course cultivates skills for effective preaching and public speaking about Islam, and enables emerging Muslim leaders to address questions involving Islamic law in a contextual manner. Topics include freedom of expression, living in pluralistic societies, gender rights and relations, governance, social justice, peace and violence, ethics and morality, and cultural flux. This course will prepare students to address a variety of audiences and contexts, including speaking to the media, to interfaith communities, to international audiences, and to civic groups.

Islam in America

This course covers the origins, key historical milestones, and institutional developments of Muslims in North America. Students will develop a critical understanding of internal and external discourses about Islam in the West. The political, social and cultural features of diverse Muslim American communities will be examined in the light of common narratives regarding multiculturalism, immigration, enfranchisement, and social mobility. Finally, the place of Muslims in the American public square will be explored.

Global Islamic Movements and Ideologies

This course is an introduction to the major figures, issues, ideologies, and texts of the 20th century and early 21st century of Islamic thought. We shall analyze the responses given to the challenges of modernity, postmodernity, colonialism, and post-colonialism. To this end, we will have a number of readings from Muslim philosophers and theologians (such as Seyyed Qutb, Mawdudi, S. Hossein Nasr, Yusuf al-Qaradawi, Hasan al-Turabi, Ruhollah Khomeini, Tariq Ramadan, Said Nursi, Fazlur Rahman, Khaled Abou el-Fadl, Fethullah Gulen, Abdulkerim Sourush, Mohammad Arkoun etc.) to familiarize ourselves with the concerns, tendencies, language and nomenclature of the contemporary Islamic thought.